Non-representational geographies: practices, pedagogies and writing

Non-representational geographies: practices, pedagogies and writing

Andrew S. Maclaren (The University of Aberdeen)

Vannini has described non-representational theories as ‘one of the contemporary moment’s most influential theoretical perspectives within social and cultural theory’ (2015, p. 2). However, if non-representational theories are to be truly considered in this vane, there needs to be further consideration of how they are practiced, taught and written (Lorimer, 2015) with responses to the following questions to be developed:

  1. ‘what is the nature of praxis’ (Ibid, p.181) in an expanded community of scholars using non-representational theories, particularly with the numerous parallel calls in the various sub disciplines of geography?
  2. how might we not forget students who are keen to learn and engage but often ‘foxed by the prospect of venturing out alone’ (Ibid, p.184)?;
  3. how have non-representational theories affected the way geographers write and present their research?

This session wishes to explore these questions directly, by soliciting perspectives from scholars of non-representational theories. It aims to create a forum where this triad of practice, pedagogy and writing may be reflected through the various experiences of contributors. The session aims to contribute to the conference theme of decolonising geographical knowledge, by opening up non-representational geographies to scholars keen to engage with this ‘influential theoretical perspective’.

Bibliography

Lorimer, H. (2015) ‘Afterword: Non-Representational Theory and Me Too’, In Vannini, P. (ed.), Non-Representational Methodologies: Re-Envisioning Research, New York & London, Routledge.

Vannini, P. (2015) ‘Non-Representational Research methodologies: An Introduction’, In Vannini, P. (ed.), Non-Representational Methodologies: Re-Envisioning Research, Abingdon, Routledge.

 

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