Post-phenomenological Geographies: methods and styles of researching and writing the human

Post-phenomenological Geographies: methods and styles of researching and writing the human

James Ash (Newcastle University) and Paul Simpson (Plymouth University)

In the last ten years, cultural geographers have increasingly embraced what could be termed a post-phenomenological way of thinking about human embodiment and subjectivity (Wylie 2006, Simpson 2009, Ash 2012, Ash and Simpson 2014). This approach has drawn upon a range of thinkers from Derrida (1994) to Nancy (2000) to Malabou (2009) to Stiegler (1998) to destabalise notions of identity or subjectivity as the source or foundation of experience. However, much of this work has been mainly theoretical in nature (Wylie 2006, Ash and Simpson 2014). As such, less work has discussed how to go about developing methodologies and methods to conduct post-phenomenological research. This session aims to address this imbalance by drawing together a range of papers that focus on post-phenomenological methods and methodologies. Papers could focus on:

  • Critical (re)engagements with phenomenological and post-phenomenological modes or methods of analysis
  • Post-human and Actor Network Theory approaches
  • Differences and similarities between non-representational and post-phenomenological approaches to studying embodiment
  • Feminist and queer approaches to embodied practice
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The website for the Royal Geographical Society's History and Philosophy of Geography Research Group

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