Attentive Geographies: materials, processes, creations

Attentive Geographies: materials, processes, creations

Fran Rylands (University of Exeter)

The creative turn in Geography has cemented the long-standing relationships between geography and creative practitioners. Creative geographies are no longer studied as a product, instead practices are attentively shaping our learning, doing and knowing. This call for papers responds to this shift in geographers working and developing their capacities with a variety of creative methods, skills and approaches.

‘Attentive geographies’ calls for contributions that explore the tensions, challenges and opportunities of creative practice as research process. What happens when you commit to deepening and developing skill? What emerges when the subject of research, becomes methodology? What is gained by undertaking creative geographies by doing? What difference does the practical doing make? How does collaboration emerge through creative methodologies? What does it mean to be a geographer as practitioner?

Contributions might respond to:

  • Methods of attentive practice
  • Relations with materials and making
  • Paying attention to collaborative relations
  • Stories of working with things
  • Attentive impact
  • Small scale changes through attentive encounters
  • Experimentation and working with research in process
  • Exploration of skills / expanding understandings of practice
  • Small stories and attentiveness to geographical concerns through practice
  • The spatial relations of research practice
  • Communicating process, practice and experience
  • Embodiment, haptic knowledges, sensory engagements

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The website for the Royal Geographical Society's History and Philosophy of Geography Research Group

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