Category Archives: HPGRG News

Call for papers : Bridging Differences: East, West, Seas and Mediterranean worlds. (34th International Geographical Congress, Istanbul 17-21 August 2020)

34th International Geographical Congress, Istanbul 17-21 August 2020

Joint CFP of the Commission History of Geography, the Commission Gender and Geography and the Commission Political Geography

BRIDGING DIFFERENCES: EAST, WEST, SEAS AND MEDITERRANEAN WORLDS

Chair: Marcella Schmidt di Friedberg
Co-chairs: Virginie Mamadouh, Lynda Johnston

Call for papers:

For a long time, the categories of East, West, North and South have been used as both Cartesian coordinates and as metaphors assigning identities, often under the form of stereotypes, to people coming from different places. The successive waves of critical, radical, feminist, post/decolonial and non-representational geographies and geopolitics have increasingly questioned the essentialisation of identities deriving from these metaphors, especially criticising their use for imperialist, patriarchal, racist and reactionary political agendas, past and present. International geographical scholarship committed to these critical approaches urges us to substitute the absolute geographical metaphors mentioned above with the metaphor of ‘the bridge’. ‘The bridge’ valorises all kind of differences, as well as the decolonisation of geography by rendering it mostly inclusive (in terms of gender, ethnicity, social conditions and political/religious thought of people participating in the discipline). Further, the metaphor of ‘the bridge’ reconfigures the Mediterranean as a place of contacts and exchanges rather than a place for erecting walls, barriers or any kinds of enclosures. Interventions about other seas (and maybe deserts that function in a similar way) are also welcome. By assuming intersectional principles recognising that social, economic, political, religious, ethnic, speciesist, environmental and colonial forms of oppression are intrinsically linked the one to each other, the organisers of this joint session welcome all contributions that engage with the broad field of studies on critical, radical, anarchist, feminist, queer, intersectional, internationalist geographies. We welcome presentations that draw on critical social theory, critical race studies and socially and politically engaged scholarship, in general. The participation of non-

academic presenters such as activists and independent scholars, is especially encouraged.

Please send an abstract by 13 January 2020 following the instructions in the Conference website: https://www.igc2020.org/en/default.asp

For info: marcella.schmidt@unimib.it

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Call for papers: IGU Thematic Conference Heritage Geographies: Politics, Uses and Governance of the Past, Lecce (Italy), May 29-31 2020

The IGU Commission History of Geography would like to draw attention to the following call for papers:

SOUTHERN THINKING. HERITAGE, MIGRATION AND MEDITERRANEAN CULTURES

For this session, we welcome empirical or theoretical contributions that place heritage- related issues in the context of Mediterranean histories, cultures and circulations. The Mediterranean has disgracefully become a (disputed and violent) frontier, while in several historical periods it has been a “valley” putting different cultures in mutual communication and cross-pollination. These notions, which are expressed in a heterogeneous way, can be found in the works of classical geographers such as Carl Ritter and Elisée Reclus, of artists such as Paul Signac and Henri Matisse and leading 20th-century European intellectuals such as Paul Valéry, Albert Camus and Gilles Deleuze. More recently, similar ideas have returned in the ‘Southern Thinking’ by Franco Cassano and in the concept of multiple ‘Souths’ by the Latin American authors of the Modernity-Coloniality-Decoloniality movement. Contributions refreshing the relations between these lines of thought and debates on geography and heritage, tangible and intangible, would be greatly appreciated.

We would especially like to receive proposals on:

Decolonial thinking and geographies of the Souths
Southern thinking and postcolonial, decolonial and anticolonial approaches in geography and cognate disciplines
Southern thinking and decoloniality in their relation to feminism and gendered approaches
Mediterranean worlds and metaphors in geography
Historical geographies of Italy and other Mediterranean countries
Historical geographies and geopolitics of land and sea
Critical and radical geographies and their relations to heritage issues
Works and lives of geographers committed to intercultural dialogue, anti-racism and anti-colonialism
Geopoetics, artistic and literary geographies from/about the Souths
Geography and geophilosophy
Geographies of migration and culture’s meetings
Any other topic in the history and philosophy of geography
[Organisers: Marcella Schmidt di Friedberg and Federico Ferretti]

To submit your abstract, please follow the guidelines below and send it to

info@heritagegeographies.it

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When submitting your abstract, please include:
• Submitter’s contact details (Full first and family name(s), email, phone number, country)
• Presenting author’s and co-Authors’ details (Full first and family name(s), postal address, mail)
• Affiliation details: Institution/Company/University, city, country
• Abstract type: poster or oral
• Session number
• Abstract title
• Abstract text: the abstract should not exceed 2500 characters spaces included
• Keywords: up to 5 keywords may be provided

http://www.heritagegeographies.it/home.htm

Deadline: 31st December 2019 Acceptance: 31st January 2020

For info : federico.ferretti@ucd.ie

HPGRG Dissertation Prize 2019 Announced

We are delighted to announce that the dissertation prize panel recommended a joint award of the prize to two dissertations of exceptionally high quality. The joint winners of this year’s prize are Olivia Russell (University of Edinburgh) and Mitchell Wilson (University of Bristol).

Olivia Russel’s dissertation, Geography, Cartography and Military Intelligence: Gertrude Campbell’s Cartographic Work for the Royal Geographical Society in 1913 to 1918, is a study of archival material relating to the life and cartographic work of Gertrude Bell, focusing on her contributions to military intelligence in World War I through cartographic work in ‘Arabia’. The work presents a nuanced, multiple understanding of Bell and her activities. Empirical chapters are structured through three key themes (informed by a critical engagement with literature) and demonstrate keen attention to detail in the use of evidence and construction of arguments. Overall, the dissertation draws on a great range of primary source material from the archives of the RGS, using these to consider issues around both colonialism and the role of women in the production of geographical knowledge. It thus responds to very contemporary questions about structural issues within the discipline. This is a standout dissertation addressing the history of geography, which adds to calls for the inclusion of ‘all marginalised knowledges’ within a critical historiography of the discipline.

Mitchell Wilson’s dissertation, Expanding the Empirical Repertoire of Non-Representational Theory Through a Methodological Reflection on Creating a Documentary Film, presents a theoretically sophisticated discussion of Geography’s relation to film-making, and takes direction from a range of multi-disciplinary work (including non-representational theory and visual culture), making new connections between them. It then embarks on the production of a documentary film to demonstrate how film-making techniques can be used to engineer affect, thus moving beyond ‘critique’ to become productive. The documentary, which is very thoughtfully curated and presented, explores the art and subversive qualities of drag through the performances of Ty Jeffries. This is then used to explore the nature of ‘hope’ in the Anthropocene: a discussion which simultaneously seems somewhat tangential and yet in keeping with the “ephemerality and transitory nature” of the research. Overall the work is remarkable in its level of sophisticated and critical engagement with literature; in its care and attention to detail; and in its sensitivity. It forms an important contribution to discussions around videographic geographies, presenting astute readings of Spinoza to think hope as ‘unsteady joy’.

Committee changes following the AGM

We have a number of out-going committee members following the most recent AGM.

The Chair, Heike Jöns, thanked Pauline Couper for her exemplary work as HPGRG Undergraduate Prize Coordinator over two terms from 2013 to 2019. She also thanked Thomas Jellis for having built up the new HPGRG website and Twitter account and for looking after these with great commitment and dedication from 2013 to 2019.

The Research Group welcomed Emily Hayes to the committee as Undergraduate Prize Coordinator and, following some discussion, the  role of Website Editor will now be merged with that of the Communications Officer (Michiel Van Meeteren).

We hope to appoint a Postgraduate Liaison Officer in the near future.

Agenda for the AGM at RGS-IBG 2019

13:10 to 14:25, Friday, 30  August,  Royal Geographical Society (with IBG), Lowther Room

  1. Apologies
  1. Minutes of 2018 AGM (HJ)
  1. HPGRG Sessions for 2019 (FF)
  1. HPGRG Research Group Guests for 2019 (HJ)
  1. HPGRG Accounts (JB)
  1. HPGRG Dissertation Prize (PC)
  1. HPGRG Membership (FG)
  1. HPGRG Website (TJ)
  1. HPGRG Communications and Newsletter (MvM)
  1. Committee Membership Terms and Elections (HJ)
  1. HPGRG Information Sheet on Job Roles (HJ)
  1. 35th HPGRG anniversary in 2020 (HJ)
  1. Possible Research Group Activities (ALL)
  1. Call for Sessions for 2020 RGS-IBG Annual International Conference (HJ)
  1. Any Other Business

Newsletter 2019 #2 out now

The latest issue of our newsletter is now out!

This newsletter contains, among other things, the agenda of our HPGRG Annual General Meeting at the RGS-IBG Annual International Conference in London next week and a list of HPGRG-sponsored sessions during this event. You are cordially invited to attend the HPGRG AGM and the HPGRG-sponsored sessions, but the latter require official conference registration, while the former could be attended with an AGM visitor pass only (please see message from the HPGRG chair in the newsletter).

We hope that you will find this second HPGRG newsletter of interest and look forward to your contributions to future editions – the third HPGRG newsletter of this year is due to be published in the autumn of 2019.

You can see all our newsletters here.

Newsletter 2019 #1 now out!

Our HPGRG committee has decided to relaunch a regular HPGRG email newsletter three times a year, which will be edited by our new HPGRG Communications Officer, Dr Michiel van Meeteren (Loughborough University) in January/February, May/June and September/October.

If you wish to communicate publications, events or other information of interest to the HPGRG membership via the next HPGRG newsletter, which will be sent in June, please email Michiel van Meeteren.

We hope that you will find our HPGRG Newsletter informative and look forward to your contributions to future editions.